This article will give you the possibility to configure EIGRP using Cisco Packet Tracer. Before you attempt to configure any EIGRP commands, I would advise you to go through this article from Intense school website: Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP).

The above mentioned resource will give you a refresh of EIGRP topics. Before configuring the commands, you should know which commands you need and when verification is done, you should know how a normal output should look like.

For this simulation, I have created three Packet Tracer files:

  • configuring_eigrp_init.pkt – this is the initial topology with all the IP addressing already configured. There is no EIGRP configuration done in this file.
  • configuring_eigrp_features.pkt – this is the starting point of the second task where you will be changing few of the default values of EIGRP. This file can also be used as verification for the first task.
  • configuring_eigrp_final_config – this file has the final configuration of all devices at the end of task one and task two. Use this file to compare your simulation with mine.

Regarding the topology, on the subnets where a PC is connected, the router’s interface has an IP address whose last octet is .1 and last octet of the PC’s IP address is .100. The default gateway of the PC is the router’s IP address.

For instance, on the subnet with PC_4: PC_4 has the IP address of 10.10.40.100/24 and R4’s interface IP address is 10.10.40.1/24.

Each router has a loopback address in the form of 1.1.1.X/32, where X is the router number. For instance, the loopback address of R3 is 1.1.1.3/32.

Also, each subnet between the routers is written on the topology and every router is using as the last octet its router number. For instance, on the subnet 10.10.14.0/24, R1 has 10.10.14.1/24 and R4 has 10.10.14.4/24.

Task 1 requirements

  1. Configure R1, R2, R3 and R4 to advertise their subnets towards the other routers in EIGRP.
  2. Configure R1, R2, R3 and R4 to advertise their loopback interfaces in EIGRP.
  3. Make sure that on the subnets where a PC is connected, the routers are not attempting to establish any neighborship, but they are still advertised in EIGRP.
  4. Make sure that each router will receive all the loopbacks of the other routers through EIGRP.

Task 1 verification

  1. Use the command ‘show ip eigrp neighbors’ to confirm that the EIGRP neighborship is established between the routers.
  2. Check the routing table of each router to confirm that you have all the possible subnets.
  3. Test the connectivity between the two PCs by pinging PC_4 from PC_1.

Task 1 hints

  1. Use the command ‘router eigrp 100’ on all router to start the EIGRP protocol.
  2. Use the command ‘network X.X.X.X 0.0.0.X’ to let EIGRP to start adjacencies on the respective interfaces.
  3. Use the command ‘passive-interface’ to make sure that R1 and R4 will not attempt to establish any adjacency over the interfaces where the hosts are connected.
  4. Use the command ‘no auto-summary’ to disable the auto-summarization between two different major networks (i.e. between 1.0.0.0 and 10.0.0.0).

Task 2 requirements

  1. Configure R1, R2, R3 and R4 to use an EIGRP hello timer twice the default value.
  2. Configure R1, R2, R3 and R4 to change the administrative distance for internal routes to 70 and for external routes to 80.
  3. Configure R1, R2, R3 and R4 so that a route that has a metric 64 times higher than the best route could still be used.

Task 2 verification

  1. Use the command ‘show ip eigrp neighbors’ to confirm that the hold timer is decreasing down to 5, instead to 10 seconds.
  2. Use ‘show ip route eigrp’ to confirm that the administrative distance is now 70, instead of 90. We don’t have external routes, but if we did, then the administrative distance would have been 80 instead of 170.

Task 2 hints

  1. Use the command ‘ip hello-interval eigrp 100 10’ on all the inter router links to double the default size of hello interval from 5 to 10 seconds.
  2. Use the command ‘distance eigrp 70 80’ to change the administrative distance for internal routes to 70 and for external routes to 80.
  3. Use the command ‘variance 64’ under EIGRP protocol configuration to control the load balancing.

Now that you finished this simulation, you can continue and explore other EIGRP features that are available in Packet Tracer.