By going through this article and by working on the tutorial attached, you will have the chance to configure Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) and few IP services. Before going any further and start configuring these features, I advise you to read these articles from Intense school website: CCNA Series: IP Services Part 1, CCNA Series: IP Services Part 2: First Hop Redundancy Protocols, and CCNA IP Services Part 4: Network Management.

I created two files:

  • configuring_ip_services_init.pkt – this is the initial topology and should be used as starting point.
  • configuring_ip_services_final.pkt – this is the final configuration and you can use it to verify your configuration.

Regarding the topology, the SWITCH_LAN has all interfaces in VLAN 100, therefore all PCs, the SERVER and the FastEthernet0/0 interfaces from R1 and R2 are in VLAN 100.

With regards to the routers interfaces in VLAN 100, the IP addressing is already written on the diagram.

The subnets between R3 and R1 and R3 and R2 are written on the diagram. The fourth octet of the IP address is the router number. For instance, the IP address of R3 on the subnet between R3 and R1 is 1.1.13.3/24.

The PCs are configured to use DHCP to get an IP address.

The SERVER has a static IP address of 1.1.100.100/24. This device will be used as NTP source, SYSLOG server.

Task 1 requirements

  1. Configure R1 to assign DHCP address from the network 1.1.100.0/24.
  2. Configure R1 to exclude the following IP addresses: 1.1.100.100, 1.1.100.101, 1.1.100.102, 1.1.100.254.
  3. Configure R1 to advertise 1.1.100.254 as default gateway to DHCP clients.
  4. Configure R1 to advertise 1.1.100.100 as DNS server to DHCP clients.

Task 1 verification

  1. Use the command ‘show ip dhcp binding’ on R1 to confirm that the hosts requested the IP address and they were provided by R1. You should see something similar like:

    IP address Client-ID/ Lease expiration Type
    Hardware address
    1.1.100.1 0010.11B2.6025 — Automatic
    1.1.100.2 000D.BD23.CD78 — Automatic
    1.1.100.3 0060.47CD.061B — Automatic

  2. Connect to one of the PC. Go to Desktop tab and choose Command Prompt. Type ipconfig /all to view the IP address assigned.

Task 1 hints

  1. Use the command ‘ip dhcp excluded-address’ to exclude the four IP addresses from being assigned by the DHCP server.
  2. Use the command ‘ip dhcp pool’ command to create a DHCP pool from where to assign IP addresses.
  3. Use the command ‘network 1.1.100.0 255.255.255.0’ to specify the subnet from where to allocate IP addresses.
  4. Use the command ‘default-router’ to specify the default gateway.
  5. Use the command ‘dns-server’ to specify the DNS server.

NOTE. You will not be able to ping the default gateway before you will finish Task 2.

Task 2 requirements

  1. Configure R1 to be the active HSRP router using virtual IP 1.1.100.254 with the priority 105.
  2. Configure R2 to be the standby HSRP router using virtual IP 1.1.100.254 with the default priority.
  3. Configure R1 and R2 to decrease their HSRP priority with 10 in case the FastEthernet0/1 is down.
  4. Configure R1 and R2 to be able to pre-empt the active router.

Task 2 verification

  1. Use the command ‘show standby’ on R1 to confirm that R1 is the active router and on R2 to confirm that R2 is the standby router.
  2. Shutdown Fa0/1 on R1 and confirm that the HSRP priority for R1 was lowered to 95 and became the standby router and R2 became the active router.
  3. Bring up Fa0/1 on R1 and confirm that the HSRP priority for R1 was increased to 105 and became the active router and R2 became the standby router.
  4. From any of the PCs, ping the virtual IP addresses, 1.1.100.254.

Task 2 hints

  1. Use the command ‘standby 1 ip 1.1.100.254’ on both R1 and and R2 on FastEthernet0/0 interfaces.
  2. Use the command ‘standby 1 preempt’ on both R1 and R2 to be able to pre-empt the active router.
  3. Use the command ‘standby 1 priority 105’ on R1 to make sure that R1 will be the active router.
  4. Use the command ‘standby 1 track FastEthernet0/1’ on R1 to decrease the priority with 10 in case FastEthernet0/1 is down.

Task 3 requirements

  1. Configure on R1 and R2 the community Cisco with read-write access.
  2. Configure R1 and R2 to send the log messages to 1.1.100.100 with the level of debugging.
  3. Configure R1 and R2 to use as NTP server 1.1.100.100.

Task 3 verification

  1. Use the command ‘show logging’ and look for string ‘Logging to 1.1.100.100’ to make sure that the log messages will be sent to 1.1.100.100.
  2. Additionally, you can connect to SERVER, choose Config tab and from the left column, choose SYSLOG. You should see messages received from 1.1.100.101(R1) and 1.1.100.102(R2).
  3. Use ‘show ntp status’ to check if the clock is synchronized with 1.1.100.100.

Task 3 hints

  1. Use the command ‘snmp-server community cisco rw’ to configure the SNMP community.
  2. Use the command ‘logging host 1.1.100.100’ and ‘logging trap debugging’ to enable logging to 1.1.100.100.
  3. Use the command ‘ntp server 1.1.100.100’ to configure 1.1.100.100 as NTP server.

By finishing this tutorial, you will become familiar with ones of the most used features of a Cisco device. Basically, every network device has syslog, SNMP and ntp enabled.

In enterprise, it’s very common to have HSRP and DHCP configured to provide redundancy and IP addresses to the LAN users.

As always, do not stop on the topics described in this tutorial. Go further and experiment on your own.